Upcoming Events

July

Tours run every Thursday, Friday, Saturday, Sunday, and Monday from 10:00 a.m. - 4:00 p.m., with the last tour leaving at 3:30 p.m.

July 20th: Homestead Lecture Series: "Burlington Ghosts" 4:00p.m. Free admission

Every community with a long history has had strange and unexplained occurrences. Thea Lewis, the Host of Burlington's Ghost Walks will share some of the lesser known history of Burlington and surrounding areas. Donations appreciated.

July 26th: Experience History Workshop: Off the Cob: The Many Uses of Corn 10:00am- 3:00p.m. included in the price of admission

Corn was a staple grain for the early Vermonters, but it was unlike the corn we enjoy now. It was used for bread, porridge, sweets, alcohol and anything else a creative cook could envision. Moreover its cobs were made into toys, its husks into containers, and many others. Come down to learn a little about this unique plant, and sample some of the things made with it! Donations appreciated.

 

August

Tours run every Thursday, Friday, Saturday, Sunday, and Monday from 10:00 a.m. - 4:00 p.m., with the last tour leaving at 3:30 p.m.

August 3rd: Smugglers and Shootouts: The Black Snake Affair  2:00 p.m.

In 1807, in response to attempts by both the British and French to sabotage American neutrality in the Napoleonic Wars, President Thomas Jefferson signed the Embargo Act. This Act was aimed to prevent the seizing of American Merchant cargo as war contraband and the forced conscription of American sailors. It was incredibly unpopular in Vermont, whose chief trade partner was British Canada, and many Vermonters smuggled cargo North. One such ship, the Black Snake, was caught smuggling potash by federalized Vermont militia on the Winooski River, and the resulting shootout killed two of the Militiamen and Jonathan Ormsby, a farmer living at the Ethan Allen Homestead. The Black Snake Affair, as it came to be called was a highly partisan political issue, and is etched in Vermont's memory as a symbol both of resistance against government policy and the lawlessness of the early Frontier.Author Gary Shattuck will present on his new book about the incident, and then lead us to the approximate site of the event where a State Historical Marker commemorating the incident will be dedicated.